One player at each table scribes ideas on chart paper 3. Each person contributes an idea that answers the question 4. Afterwards, the player places their chip in the center of the table. Listen while others contribute their views 6. Have students write 3 facts and a fib on a sticky about a subject, content or problem 2. They will trade with a partner to find the fib 3. Discussions 4. Get 2 sticky notes 2. Write "Fact" on one 3.

Mission Critical: Reading Together to Build Critical Thinking Skills | Reading Rockets

Write "Fib" on the other 4. Instructor will read a statement 5. Instructor will count, "" Compare responses 7. Differentiation and Multiple Representations. This helps with students distinguishing between and creating their own multiple representations. A word problem is posted on a graphic organizer different problem for each person in the group.

Boxes are strategically placed on the graphic organizer with various representations. Students choose the box they like, place their name in the box and complete the activity. When finished, they pass it to the group member to their right. Now everyone has a new problem They read the new problem, check their partner's box and complete a different box.

Continue to pass and play. Students work from a 2x2 or 3x3 grid in a tic-tac-toe format Activities in each box represent Bloom's type activities, such as: - create a drawing that shows Teacher creates a numbered 6 box graphic with varied activities on a student expectation. Students roll die to determine which 3 activities to complete. Students work together to record their answers. My number has nine digits It is evenly divisible by The value of one of the digits is , The digit in the millions place is both even and prime The digit in the hundreds place is the temperature at which water freezes The digit in the ten millions place is triple the number in the millions place The digit in the thousands place is the number of fluid ounces in a cup The digit in the hundred millions place is a special number because it is a factor of every number.

Place butcher paper around the room with different question stems, problems or activities. Students are in groups of students in each. Each group has a different colored marker. They go to each poster for minutes doing the activity required. After they are prompted by the teacher to switch, they check the other groups response with: a check if they agree or a correction if they disagree and WHY They then create their own question stem, problem or activity for the upcoming group.


  • Collaboration.
  • 2. Critical Thinking Lesson Plans by TEDEd.
  • Exploring the Reading-Writing Relationship for Critical Thinking;
  • Teaching Strategies to Promote Critical Thinking!

Thinking Bubbles This activity is to be facilitated by the teacher and is for the groups collaborating as much as it is the main student who is guessing the word. A vocabulary word is held above a student's head where they cannot see it. The other students in the room collaborate to find the best clues for the vocabulary word.

Distance Learning

Frayer Model Vocabulary This can be done many different ways. I will give you a very collaborative one that I like. Vocabulary word goes in the center of a 2x2 grid for each group and one large one for the whole class. Each definition is written with different colored markers in the right corner of class Frayer, while corrections are made in a polite, productive manner. This element involves students reflecting on, adjusting and explaining their thinking and identifying the thinking behind choices, strategies and actions taken.

Students think about thinking metacognition , reflect on actions and processes, and transfer knowledge into new contexts to create alternatives or open up possibilities. They apply knowledge gained in one context to clarify another. This element involves students analysing, synthesising and evaluating the reasoning and procedures used to find solutions, evaluate and justify results or inform courses of action.

Students identify, consider and assess the logic and reasoning behind choices. They differentiate components of decisions made and actions taken and assess ideas, methods and outcomes against criteria. The imparting of knowledge content and the development of thinking skills are accepted today as primary purposes of education.

The explicit teaching and embedding of critical and creative thinking throughout the learning areas encourages students to engage in higher order thinking. By using logic and imagination, and by reflecting on how they best tackle issues, tasks and challenges, students are increasingly able to select from a range of thinking strategies and use them selectively and spontaneously in an increasing range of learning contexts.

Critical Thinking

Activities that foster critical and creative thinking should include both independent and collaborative tasks, and entail some sort of transition or tension between ways of thinking. They should be challenging and engaging, and contain approaches that are within the ability range of the learners, but also challenge them to think logically, reason, be open-minded, seek alternatives, tolerate ambiguity, inquire into possibilities, be innovative risk-takers and use their imagination.

Critical and creative thinking can be encouraged simultaneously through activities that integrate reason, logic, imagination and innovation; for example, focusing on a topic in a logical, analytical way for some time, sorting out conflicting claims, weighing evidence, thinking through possible solutions, and then, following reflection and perhaps a burst of creative energy, coming up with innovative and considered responses. Critical and creative thinking are communicative processes that develop flexibility and precision.

Communication is integral to each of the thinking processes. By sharing thinking, visualisation and innovation, and by giving and receiving effective feedback, students learn to value the diversity of learning and communication styles. Students learn and practise critical and creative thinking as they pose questions, research, analyse, evaluate and communicate information, concepts and ideas. Students identify, explore and determine questions to clarify social issues and events, and apply reasoning, interpretation and analytical skills to data and information.

Critical thinking is essential to the historical inquiry process because it requires the ability to question sources, interpret the past from incomplete documentation, assess reliability when selecting information from resources, and develop an argument using evidence. Students develop critical thinking through geographical investigations that help them think logically when evaluating and using evidence, testing explanations, analysing arguments and making decisions, and when thinking deeply about questions that do not have straightforward answers.

Students learn to critically evaluate texts about people, places, events, processes and issues, including consumer and financial, for shades of meaning, feeling and opinion, by identifying subjective language, bias, fact and opinion, and how language and images can be used to manipulate meaning. They develop civic knowledge by considering multiple perspectives and alternatives, and reflecting on actions, values and attitudes, thus informing their decision-making and the strategies they choose to negotiate and resolve differences. Students develop creative thinking through the examination of social, political, legal, civic, environmental and economic issues, past and present, that that are contested, do not have obvious or straightforward answers, and that require problem-solving and innovative solutions.

click here Creative thinking is important in developing creative questions, speculation and interpretations during inquiry. Students are encouraged to be curious and imaginative in investigations and fieldwork, and to explore relevant imaginative texts. Critical and creative thinking is essential for imagining probable, possible and preferred futures in relation to social, environmental, economic and civic sustainability and issues.

Students think creatively about appropriate courses of action and develop plans for personal and collective action. They develop enterprising behaviours and capabilities to imagine possibilities, consider alternatives, test hypotheses, and seek and create innovative solutions, and think creatively about the impact of issues on their own lives and the lives of others. In the Australian Curriculum: History, critical thinking is essential to the historical inquiry process because it requires the ability to question sources, interpret the past from incomplete documentation, develop an argument using evidence, and assess reliability when selecting information from resources.

My TeachHUB.com

Creative thinking is important in developing new interpretations to explain aspects of the past that are contested or not well understood. In the Australian Curriculum: Geography, students develop critical and creative thinking as they investigate geographical information, concepts and ideas through inquiry-based learning. They develop and practise critical and creative thinking by using strategies that help them think logically when evaluating and using evidence, testing explanations, analysing arguments and making decisions, and when thinking deeply about questions that do not have straightforward answers.

Students learn the value and process of developing creative questions and the importance of speculation.

Search form

Students are encouraged to be curious and imaginative in investigations and fieldwork. The geography curriculum also stimulates students to think creatively about the ways that the places and spaces they use might be better designed, and about possible, probable and preferable futures. They learn to apply decision-making processes and use strategies to negotiate and resolve differences.

Students develop critical and creative thinking through the examination of political, legal and social issues that do not have obvious or straightforward answers and that require problem-solving and innovative solutions. Students consider multiple perspectives and alternatives, think creatively about appropriate courses of action and develop plans for action.

The Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship stimulates students to think creatively about the impact of civic issues on their own lives and the lives of others, and to consider how these issues might be addressed. In the Australian Curriculum: The Arts, critical and creative thinking is integral to making and responding to artworks. In creating artworks, students draw on their curiosity, imagination and thinking skills to pose questions and explore ideas, spaces, materials and technologies.

They consider possibilities and make choices that assist them to take risks and express their ideas, concepts, thoughts and feelings creatively. They consider and analyse the motivations, intentions and possible influencing factors and biases that may be evident in artworks they make to which they respond. They offer and receive effective feedback about past and present artworks and performances, and communicate and share their thinking, visualisation and innovations to a variety of audiences.


  • Why critical thinking matters.
  • proper paragraph spacing essay?
  • Critical Thinking: Why Is It So Hard to Teach?.
  • You are here;
  • Information.

In the Australian Curriculum: Technologies, students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they imagine, generate, develop and critically evaluate ideas. They develop reasoning and the capacity for abstraction through challenging problems that do not have straightforward solutions. Students analyse problems, refine concepts and reflect on the decision-making process by engaging in systems, design and computational thinking.

They identify, explore and clarify technologies information and use that knowledge in a range of situations. Students think critically and creatively about possible, probable and preferred futures. They consider how data, information, systems, materials, tools and equipment past and present impact on our lives, and how these elements might be better designed and managed. Experimenting, drawing, modelling, designing and working with digital tools, equipment and software helps students to build their visual and spatial thinking and to create solutions, products, services and environments.

In the Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education HPE , students develop their ability to think logically, critically and creatively in response to a range of health and physical education issues, ideas and challenges. They learn how to critically evaluate evidence related to the learning area and the broad range of associated media and other messages to creatively generate and explore original alternatives and possibilities.

Critical thinking and reading

The Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education also provides learning opportunities that support creative thinking through dance making, games creation and technique refinement. Including a critical inquiry approach is one of the five propositions that have shaped the HPE curriculum. Critical and creative thinking are essential to developing analytical and evaluative skills and understandings in the Australian Curriculum: English.

Students use critical and creative thinking through listening to, reading, viewing, creating and presenting texts, interacting with others, and when they recreate and experiment with literature, and discuss the aesthetic or social value of texts. Through close analysis of text and through reading, viewing and listening, students critically analyse the opinions, points of view and unstated assumptions embedded in texts. In discussion, students develop critical thinking as they share personal responses and express preferences for specific texts, state and justify their points of view and respond to the views of others.

In creating their own written, visual and multimodal texts, students also explore the influence or impact of subjective language, feeling and opinion on the interpretation of text.